Donate

We support women and girls in war and crisis zones

MediathekMedia Centre
NAVIGATION

Media Centre

medica mondiale Media Centre

Our Infoflyer informs you about our work, our aims and our projects. A life with dignity and free of violence is a fundamental right of every woman and girl.

However, the reality is that, much too often, this right is blatantly disregarded and brutally violated. We want to change this! Throughout the world, militias and armies use violence against women and girls during conflict in order to exercise power and subjugate opponents – and to humiliate and denigrate individual women.

Women and girls are targeted purely on the grounds of their gender. But the violence also continues after the war ends. Survivors often suffer psychological and physical injuries, leaving scars they feel for the rest of their lives. Our objective is to treat them as equals and with sensitivity while providing them with competent support. We have been doing this for more than 20 years. In this time, our stress- and trauma-sensitive approach has empowered tens of thousands of women and girls affected by violence, helping them to lead full lives again. Persistence and solidarity also characterise our political work, which seeks to achieve gender-equal structures in society.

Together, we can improve the lives of women and girls throughout the world.

Link-Medium

This report was commissioned by Medica Afghanistan and medica mondiale in September 2016.
The overall goal of the transnational health training project (THTP) is to contribute to improving the health sector response to violence against women (VAW) and thus to the empowerment and stabilization of women survivors of sexual and gender based violence (SGBV).
The objective is to increase access to healthcare services for women and girls affected by SGBV through improving the quality of care of the healthcare services at the local and national level. The project aims at sensitizing the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) at the national and provincial level on the need for improved knowledge, skills and attitudes regarding trauma and its consequences for women and their children.
The present baseline study, commissioned to Thousand Plateaus Consultancy Services, was designed to inform medica mondiale and Medica Afghanistan about the current situation regarding the quality of care for survivors of SGBV. The baseline study collected quantitative and qualitative data through exit surveys with female patients, Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice (KAP) surveys and FGDs with health staff, health facility check-lists, FGDs with women in shelters, and interviews with key stakeholders.
Key Findings
• In the exit survey with women, 7% of patients had been treated for abuse-related health concerns in the services they had received that day at the facility; 3% for injuries sustained during physical or sexual abuse; 8% for self-inflicted injuries; 7% for emotional consequences of abuse; and none for a mandated virginity exam. 12% reported that their healthcare provider had asked them questions regarding whether they were experiencing physical or sexual abuse.
• Only 4% had reported abuse to their healthcare provider where two said that their healthcare provider had encouraged them to report their abuse, and one that their healthcare provider had reported their abuse to authorities. Two had received information regarding laws that protect them from abuse from their healthcare provider. Only one woman had received information regarding physical consequences of abuse, regarding the mental and emotional consequences of abuse, and regarding supportive services available.
• 22% of patients surveyed had been treated for abuse-related health concerns, 23% for self-inflicting injuries, 7% received treatment for the emotional consequences at some point in their life.
• 28% of patients surveyed agreed with some justification for SGBV and among the patients surveyed 84% are at risk of domestic abuse.
• 81% of patients agreed that the facility is always open and staff is present during its normal operating hours; 86% of patients interviewed in the 7 GBV and trauma - sensitive health care in Afghanistan exit survey agreed that there are female staff members available when they need to seek health services at the facility; 37% of patients disagreed that sometimes the healthcare treatment and support that health providers at the facility provide are not in line with cultural norms related to gender, religion, or society.
• 47% of patients reported that there was some type of monetary cost associated with the services they had received. Of those who reported having to pay fees, 9% paid for services, 78% for medication, and 10% for tests or laboratory fees.
• The majority of patients interviewed were Dari-speaking (95%), and services were mainly reported to be given in Dari (92%), with very few reporting receiving services in other languages. 11% of patients reported that in the past year, there had been a time when they wanted to see a doctor, nurse, or other healthcare worker but were unable to because their family member/s didn’t allow them to seek treatment.
• 60% of patients surveyed agreed that if there is no female healthcare professional available, it is okay for a woman to seek treatment from a male healthcare professional. 19% agreed that if a woman is being abused by her husband, it is a private family matter and she should not seek help from public facilities.
• 45% of patients surveyed agreed that they would feel offended if a healthcare provider asked them about physical or sexual abuse. Only 55% agreed that they would feel comfortable seeking treatment at a healthcare facility if they experienced abuse from a family member and 51% agreed that they would feel comfortable seeking mental health treatment.
• The physical and emotional safety of patients and staff is low with hospitals scoring below 50% with patients and staff is low with hospitals scoring below 50% with Malalai hospital in Kabul scoring only 13%. Safety was seen as a major problem for hospital staff where patients generally feel safe at the health facilities.
• Trustworthiness, that is supported by clear information sharing practices and having policies in place that ensure services are clear, including establishing boundaries, informed consent, and clear establishment of roles and responsibilities for both clients and staff, scored between 50 and 60%, which could be interpreted as moderate level of trustworthiness. Patients felt trustworthiness as higher, which could be interpreted as lack of comparison in terms of what constitutes quality of services due to a disrupted health system till at least a decade ago.
• In terms of choice and control, the CCTIC framework looks at to what extent the program’s activities and settings maximize both client and staff experiences of choice and control. Facilities in Kabul scored between 60 and 70%, with facilities in Herat and Balkh scoring around 50%. In terms of choice, on a scale from 0 to 5, on average patients rated the health services they had received a 3.72, suggesting a generally high level of perceived choice with the lowest recorded in Balkh.
• In terms of collaboration, the CCTIC framework looks at to what extent the program’s activities and settings maximize collaboration and sharing of power between staff and clients, and to what extent the program’s activities and settings maximize collaboration and sharing of power among staff, supervisors, and administrators. Health facilities scored low in terms of collaboration, with scores between 30 to 35% in Kabul and with even lower scores - below 20% - in Balkh and Herat. On the other hand, exit surveys with patients conclude on high collaboration in the relationship between patients and health staff.
• In terms of empowerment activities and settings prioritize both client and staff empowerment and skill-building and the extent to which staff members have the resources necessary to do their jobs well. Hospitals scored mostly over 60% with a relatively high staff and patient empowerment with the exception of Malalai hospital in Kabul, which scored only 28%. The exit surveys with patients revealed a high level of perceived empowerment of patients.
• Trauma screening practices scored low in all hospitals, with only Rabia Balkhi scoring 27% and the remaining facilities 0%. The finding is also compounded by the KAP survey with health staff, who showed varying levels of appropriate practice when working with a survivor of GBV.
• Based on the findings of the health staff KAP survey, 17 respondents (81%) reported receiving training on trauma prevalence, impact, and recovery. When asked about training specific to Creating Cultures of Trauma-Informed Care (CCTIC), the participants overall reported low levels (less than half) of training.
• Health workers’ attitudes relating to SGBV are of concern and these mostly did not report appropriate attitudes.
• Four health workers felt that preventing, detecting and managing GBV is not part of the work of a health provider (19%) and three that violence against women is a family matter and not a matter of public health policy (15%). Eight (38%) believe that 8 GBV and trauma - sensitive health care in Afghanistan health service providers do not have time to inquire about GBV. Notable is the discomfort in health providers for addressing IPV as almost half do not feel comfortable discussing IPV or sexual violence with patients as over half (11 respondents, 52%) think that asking patients about IPV could offend them.
• Other worrisome responses provided from health workers were related to knowledge of the prevalence of SGBV in Afghanistan, consequences of GBV specifically related to HIV/AIDS, and risk factors related to women experiencing and reporting violence. Only 52% of surveyed health workers accurately identified that Afghanistan has specific laws on GBV/IPV.
• Health workers demonstrated mixed competency in terms of practice related to GBV. There were mixed findings in terms of how providers should assess risks of GBV, with the majority of respondents (95%) indicating they should ask the client if she has ever been hurt, 86% asking if she is currently in danger, and concerning is that 81% indicated they could ask what she may have done to be abused as to avoid it in the future. However, only around half of the respondents indicated they could assess risk by asking the woman if violence has increased in the past year (52%) and asking if she worries about the safety of children (62%).
• Health workers scored high in terms of compassion satisfaction, which is related to satisfaction of one’s ability to be an effective caregiver in their job.

Link-Medium

The film was made during a one-year project in 2016 which aimed to improve the support available for women and girls affected by violence in Afghanistan. This project received funding from the German Foreign Office.
Women’s rights in Afghanistan
Medica Afghanistan is one of the few independent organisations in Afghanistan run by women for women. Every year, their psychosocial and legal counselling programs provide support to more than 2,000 women and girls affected by violence. Traumatised women and girls receive direct assistance from Medica Afghanistan. Additionally, the Afghan women’s rights organisation is active politically, working towards an end to the violence and an improvement in protection for women and girls.
Support for women affected by violence
The film shows excerpts of the assistance provided by Medica Afghanistan to women affected by violence. The core work of the Afghan non-governmental organisation is its contribution towards improving the rights of women by performing psychosocial, legal and advocacy work.
Long-term support in women’s self-help groups
An important element of the current project is also the promotion of self-help groups where former clients of Medica Afghanistan can continue to meet, share their experiences and help each other.
The organisation Medica Afghanistan
Medica Afghanistan has projects in three regions: Kabul, Mazar-i-Sharif and Herat. Its headquarters are in Kabul. Currently the team is made up of 78 staff members, including psychologists, social workers, lawyers, mediators and human rights experts. Medica Afghanistan grew out of a medica mondiale country project. This international NGO has been working to benefit women and girls in Afghanistan since 2002. In 2010, Medica Afghanistan was registered as an independent non-governmental organisation.

Link-Medium

News about the Evaluation Report "Women’s rights in Uganda were strengthened"
Empowering female survivors of sexualized and gender-based violence in Northern Uganda. The overall objective of the project is the improvement of living conditions of female survivors of sexualized and gender-based violence in Northern Uganda. The main target group consists of 400 women particularly affected by the consequences of conflict. Additionally, about 300 female survivors of (sexualized and) gender-based violence addressing FOWAC for help receive psychosocial, legal and medical support. Measures to achieve the objectives include psychosocial counselling, socioeconomic activities and awareness raising and advocating for the rights of women and girls in collaboration with other stakeholders.

Link-Medium

News about the Evaluation Report: Transition needs tenacity and tailor-made measures

In 2013, medica Liberia started a three-year project aiming to achieve long-term improvements in the situation of women and girls in south-eastern Liberia. The intention was to ensure survivors of sexualised violence would experience solidarity and support within their village communities. However, an evaluation has now shown that rigid traditional structures, stigmatisation and the Ebola crisis all made it difficult to achieve the desired impacts.

Link-Medium

There has hardly been a year that has caused as much upheaval as 2015. It was a year in which violence was ubiquitous. We saw it in the media: terror attacks in Paris or war reports from Syria or the Ukraine.
We saw it outside the daily news coverage, for example in Afghanistan, where human rights violations and gender-based violence against women and girls keep increasing. And we see it in Europe, where the so-called community of values of the EU leaves thousands of refugees who are fleeing, at the external borders, or in overcrowded reception camps, to a fate of despair, exploitation, or death.
Policy-makers and society bear a responsibility towards those who come to us seeking shelter: to protect them and to give them a perspective. That includes providing security, work, language lessons and, particularly, stress- and trauma-sensitive counselling and support.
In order to assume its share of this responsibility, medica mondiale made Germany one of its project countries in 2015, and is going to train full-time staff and volunteers, who work with refugees, in a stress- and trauma-sensitive approach.
At the same time, we have been involved, since March 2015, in northern Iraq where thousands of refugees are now living. There, we support local authorities and women’s rights initiatives working on behalf of women and girls.
Many people in Germany want to do what we do – to help women and girls seeking refuge in Germany or elsewhere in the world. Therefore, 2015 has also been a year of solidarity – and that is encouraging. You, our supporters, have also taken action and supported us and our project colleagues with donations, messages of solidarity, creativity, and a lot of commitment.
Thank you very much.

Link-Medium

Vienna, July 22nd, 2016, OSCE Gender Conference:
- Combating violence against women in the OSCE region – bringing security home.
- Supporting victims of gender-based violence and addressing impunit.
"I’m very pleased to have the chance to contribute to this discussion. For more than 2 decades, medica mondiale has been providing support in areas of conflict and war to women and girls who have survived sexualized violence – such as in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Afghanistan or Liberia. Together with local women’s initiatives and activists we build up solidarity structures, protection and shelter networks, and independent women’s organizations. Armed conflicts may come to an end, but the suffering of survivors generally does not."
Monika Hauser

Link-Medium
Top-Thema

Armed conflicts and wars have devastating consequences for the people who are directly affected.
Girls and women are particularly affected: because they are fundamental roots of society, they are targeted as victims of rape and other forms of sexualised violence.
Sexualised violence is used as a strategy of war to attack and destroy families and whole societies. This type of violence leaves physical and emotional trauma, which the affected people often have to cope with on their own.
They are stigmatised or excluded by their communities. Sexualised violence is a serious violation of human rights and perpetrators must be punished accordingly.
That is why, the United Nations Security Council, in June 2008, adopted Resolution 1820. It explicitly states that this form of violence can be considered a war crime.
With this resolution, the UN Security Council calls for the protection of girls and women, the prevention of sexualised violence…
... and an appropriate enforcement of the law. However, the enforcement of the resolution is unfortunately not guaranteed. Many member states lack the political will to implement the resolution and the Security Council has no appropriate sanctions. medica mondiale is a feminist women's rights and aid organisation…
... which, since 1993, has been fighting continuously to overcome these deficiencies. We show solidarity, work actively on behalf of women and demand political reforms. We are currently working in 14 countries in support of survivors of sexualised violence.
We provide training and raise awareness of the causes and consequences of these crimes. Target groups include professionals in the fields of health, justice and police.
We provide survivors with access to trauma sensitive support…
... and create livelihood opportunities through education and income generating activities. Our goal is to empower girls and women. They should be able to lead independent lives and actively participate in their societies. We promote local women's organisations…
... and support the struggle for law enforcement. Our vision is a world free of violence, where girls and women can live in dignity and justice.
Please support us!

Link-Medium
donate
schließen